Jews of Turkey
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Jews of Turkey a lecture delivered before the Jewish Literary Society ... 1913 by N. Mayer

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Published by [Privately printed] in [London] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Jews -- Turkey,
  • Thessalonikē (greece)

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby N. Mayer.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBZ2301.T8
The Physical Object
Pagination46p. ;
Number of Pages46
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19053269M
LC Control Number03000227

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  Although Turkey stayed neutral during World War II, the country's policies proved crucial not only for Jews who lived in Turkey, but also to Turkish Jews living throughout Europe and the tens of thousands of Jews who desperately sought refuge in Turkey Author: Corry Guttstadt. Jews of Turkey: Migration, Culture and Memory explores the culture of Jews, who immigrated from East Turkey to Israel. The study reveals the cultural values of their communities, way of life, beliefs and traditions in the multicultural and multi-religious environment that was the East of Turkey.   This book exposes Turkish policies concerning European Jews during the Hitler era, focusing on three events: 1. The recruitment of German Jewish scholars by the Turkish government after Hitler came to power, 2. The fate of Jews of Turkish origin in German-controlled France during WWII, by: 2.   This book exposes Turkish policies concerning European Jews during the Hitler era, focusing on three events: 1. The recruitment of German Jewish scholars by the Turkish government after Hitler came to power, 2. The fate of Jews of Turkish origin in German-controlled France during WWII, 3.

Based on research in about fifty archives worldwide, Turkey, the Jews, and the Holocaust analyzes the minority politics of the Turkish republic and the country's ambivalent policies regarding Jewish refugees and Turkish Jews living abroad. Although Turkey stayed neutral during World War II, the country's policies proved crucial not only for the /5. The Jewish Community in Turkey has a long and rich history that stretches back some years to Roman times when Jews left Jerusalem and dispersed throughout the world. The beginnings of the Jewish settlement in Anatolia are believed to belong to the 3rd century BCE, when Jews from Babylonia and other countries were encouraged to settle in. The book is filled with major inaccuracies and misinterpretations, each section containing numerous problems of substance. Perhaps most surprising is the author's contention that "through its passive stance, Turkey violated its obligation to protect its [Jewish] citizens abroad" (p. ) and "it is astonishing, that, even compared to. Written by leading scholars from Israel, Turkey, Europe, and the United States, these pieces present an unusually broad historical canvas that brings together different perspectives and viewpoints. The book is a major, original contribution to Jewish history as well as to Turkish, Balkan, and Middle East studies.

In her book “Turkey, the Jews, and the Holocaust,” the historian Corry Guttstadt wrote: “Many families were forced to sell their shops and businesses, their houses, even their carpets. The Jewish population of Izmir has been since the middle of the 19th century in a steadily decline. Out of ab Jews in , making Izmir the third largest Jewish community in the Ottoman Empire, after Salonika and Istanbul, there remained o in the early years of the 20th century. What is compelling about Turkey that would make someone read one book about the country, let alone five?. I must be quite autobiographical here, as I live in Turkey. I can remember the moment when I first arrived. I was met by five incredibly grim-looking policemen in black uniforms, black moustaches, grim expressions, standing curiously under a sign marked “Strictly No Smoking”. Alkan's book in footnote My book "Dissent and Heterodoxy" which is reference for the Jews in Yemen in footnote 24 here, deals with the Babis and Baha'is in the Ottoman Empire and Turkey and doesn't have any reference to the Jews in the OE or Turkey except that I mention Jewish messianic currents in Yemen in the 19th century.